BrainBox

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April 21, 2020  

Orphan Trains across America

How were over a quarter-million orphans and unwanted children resettled by trains across the United States from 1854 until 1929? We speak with Alison Moore and Phil Lancaster, whose "Riders on the Orphan Train" programs tell this little-known story from American history. Alison and Phil discuss the circumstances that led to the orphan train movement in the mid-19th century (1:40), tell how the program actually worked (12:30), and relate stories of orphan train riders brought to Oklahoma (27:15). We also discuss how circumstances have changed for orphans and unwanted children and how these situations help us understand our country and ourselves (42:00), and we hear Alison and Phil's song "Ezra's Lullaby," inspired by the stories of the orphan train riders (1:05:00).

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Additional information about this episodeokhumanities.org/page/brainbox-s3-ep4

March 20, 2020  

Slavery in Indian Territory

Before the Civil War over 8,000 people were enslaved in Indian Territory, in what is now Oklahoma. A new exhibit on the site of a former plantation outside Tahlequah describes the lives and experiences of enslaved people on this land.  In this episode we speak with Jennifer Frazee, a historical interpreter at Hunter’s Home who has deeply researched the history of enslaved people in Indian Territory in an effort to keep their stories and history alive.

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Additional information about this episode: www.okhumanities.org/page/brainbox-s3-ep3

Find more information here about the historic site at Hunter’s Home: https://www.okhistory.org/sites/huntershome

February 21, 2020  

Monuments, Memorials, and Their Meanings

How do public monuments and memorials express the values and concerns of their cultures? What makes an effective monument, and how can its planning and development be an example of public discourse at work? Our guest, Dr. Nathan Shank of Oklahoma Christian University, has thought and studied extensively about monuments and memorials. In this episode, we discuss their deeper meanings, the emotions they convey, and some of the controversies and new developments in monuments and memorials in Oklahoma and around the world. 

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Our homepage: okhumanities.org/brainbox

Additional information about this episode: www.okhumanities.org/page/brainbox-s3-ep2

January 21, 2020  

The Struggle for Women’s Suffrage

Why did it take nearly a century and a half for women to have the right to vote in America? We speak with one of the nation's leading scholars of the women's suffrage movement, Dr. Sunu Kodumthara of Southwestern Oklahoma State University, about key aspects of the movement. As we observe the centennial of the 19th Amendment in 2020, we discuss key figures in the movements both for and against women's suffrage, surprising controversies along the way, and the impact of women's voting rights on American democracy and society. 

 

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December 20, 2019  

Time in American Life

“How do we live in time? How do we mark it? How do we make it meaningful?”

In this episode, we talk with cultural historian Dr. Alexis McCrossen about what New Year’s celebrations, advances in timekeeping technologies, conflicts over the meanings of weekends and holidays, and other aspects of time can tell us about American history and culture.

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Our homepage: okhumanities.org/brainbox

Additional information about this episode:  okhumanities.org/page/brainbox-s2-ep12

 

November 18, 2019  

Honky Tonks, Outlaws, & Red Dirt: The Story of Oklahoma’s Country Music

“The fact is, you can’t tell the story of country music without Oklahoma,” says our guest, Dr. Hugh Foley, a one-man encyclopedia of the state’s rich music history. In this episode, we discuss the huge importance and success of Oklahoma country music artists, and how country music reflects significant aspects of the state’s and the nation’s culture.  (So we basically take this podcast to the old town road and talk ‘til we can’t no more.)

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Additional information about this episode:  okhumanities.org/page/brainbox-s2-ep11

October 18, 2019  

Medical Marijuana in Oklahoma

How has #Oklahoma established perhaps the most liberal #medicalmarijuana law in the nation? We talk with two of the key activists involved in creating and solidifying the legislation, Chip Paul of Oklahomans for Health and Allison Sims of Green Country NORML. In this episode, we discuss the history of marijuana use and regulations in Oklahoma, the efforts to establish the state's #medical #marijuana program, and the current state of the industry and laws in Oklahoma.

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Additional information about this episode:  www.okhumanities.org/page/brainbox-s2-ep10

September 20, 2019  

Revisiting the Second World War

How should we remember the largest and deadliest conflict in human history, now that we are 75 years away from D-Day and 80 years from the beginning of the Second World War? We discuss the most significant aspects and some lesser-known parts of what might better be called “The Second Thirty Years War” with historian Dr. Justin Olmstead of the University of Central Oklahoma.

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Additional information about this episode:  okhumanities.org/page/brainbox-s2-e9

 

August 19, 2019  

The Wide World of Sports & the Humanities

How do college sports affect, and reflect, American culture and society? Our guest, Dr. Amy Carreiro, is a sports historian who has taught at Oklahoma State University and the University of Tulsa. (She is also probably the nicest New England Patriots fan you’ll ever meet.) In this episode, we discuss the evolution of college athletics and how sports can help us understand larger issues in American society.

Facebook: @Ok.Humanities

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Our homepage: okhumanities.org/brainbox

Additional information about this episode: okhumanities.org/page/brainbox-s2-ep8

 

July 17, 2019  

Woody Guthrie: “A Shakespeare in Overalls”

Why should we still listen to Woody Guthrie’s music and a message over 50 years after his death? This #BrainBoxOK episode features a discussion with scholars and musicians who are keeping Guthrie’s legacy of social activism alive through the folk music tradition. We look at Guthrie’s childhood in Okemah, OK; the wide range of influences on his work; stories from his life of wandering; and his continuing impact on American culture.

 

Facebook: @Ok.Humanities

Twitter: @Okhumanities

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Our homepage: okhumanities.org/brainbox

Additional information about this episode: okhumanities.org/page/brainbox-s2-ep7

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